“It’s on YOU!” proclaimed the angry email that arrived the day after the 2016 election.

“It’s on YOU!” proclaimed the angry email that arrived the day after the 2016 election.


It was from a guy I once worked with, a guy who loved telling everyone that he was a Republican who voted for Ronald Reagan, but he could never in a million years vote for Donald J. Trump. He loved to tell that story.


His hysterical emails warned that the horrible things that were about to happen would be OUR FAULT! And we couldn’t weasel out of this one.


“Its on YOU!” he said, over and over. After all, no less than a Nobel laureate in economics (Paul Krugman) predicted dire economic times if the American people elected the New York hotel magnate as our next president.


Studies showed that over 90 percent of the news coverage of Trump was negative, and this guy I once worked with was appalled that I – a retired journalist - could even think about giving him my vote.


He would get so worked up in his hatred for Trump that he was ultimately reduced to calling me filthy names. It was a classic case of Trump Derangement Syndrome. I finally had to un-friend the guy.


It was a difficult time, as I kept hearing reports that college educated people would never vote for Trump, implying that only slack-jawed guys with pickup trucks and hats with ear flaps on them, and wives named Trixie, could be stupid enough to vote for Trump. I looked at myself in the mirror and said, “But, I went to college. I even graduated! And I voted for Trump.”


I endured those difficult times, though, and the political pundits on TV who laughed at pitiful Fly Over Country gomers like me. I compensated by not talking politics with hardly anyone. Admitting you voted for Trump was like letting it slip that you were a weekend nudist, or that you eat fried squirrel brains for breakfast.


And I braced for the horrible, crippling, global recession that Paul Krugman predicted with such confidence. But, it never arrived.


In fact, after a day or so of stock market uncertainty sparked by political uncertainty, the stock market began a pretty astounding rise from around Dow 18,200 all the way up to around 25,000.


“If this is on us,” I said as the market kept rising, “this isn’t bad at all. In fact, I don’t mind having this being on me!”


Of course, that only makes you greedy in the eyes of people who hate everything about Trump. But I started out making minimum wage in a business not known for overpaying the help (newspapers), saved for most of my working career, and – here’s a shocker – invested my 401(k) money in the stock market. And market growth over the last 40 years – especially in recent years – is coming in handy in my retirement years. If that makes me a bad person, well, I can live with that. And I thank my stars for companies like Caterpillar and Union Pacific.


Along with a healthy stock market, under Trump we have also seen unemployment drop, manufacturing jobs return to the U.S., government red tape slashed, and Gross Domestic Product rise to over 4 percent. Before the election, a smug economist on TV said if you believe GDP could rise above 3 percent, you probably also believe in the Easter Bunny.


Well, believe it, pal, and Happy Easter.


Sure, sure, I would prefer a president who doesn’t get in trouble tweeting, doesn’t pay off porn stars, and doesn’t call women “Horseface.” I get that. But, all things considered, this is about policy, not personality.


These days, as the mid-term election approaches, an amazing number of Americans are still furious with Trump, despite long lists of Trump-era accomplishments. These are tough times for “Resistance” members in pink hats, who brace for the next dose of good economic news as if it was a case of the swine flu.


We should pray they don’t get their way and retake the House and Senate. But as adults, we should be more civil to them than they ever were to us.


And we can proudly say – but not too loud -  “It’s on us!”